Supreme Court Rejects Suit Over Mississippi Flag Confederate Emblem

Steadfast opposition can stifle the winds of change. Recently the U.S. Supreme court rejected an appeal from an African-American attorney who called the Confederate battle emblem on the Mississippi flag “an official endorsement of white supremacy,” reports The Associated Press.

According to The Associated Press, the justices did not comment as they ended a lawsuit by lawyer Carlos Moore that called for the flag to be declared an unconstitutional relic of slavery.  It’s like the flag that refuses to die. Mississippi has used it since 1894 and it’s the last state banner featuring the Confederate symbol, that red field topped by a blue tilted cross dotted by 13 white stars that can make emotions rise because of its history.

How did Moore respond to the court’s rejection? He told The Associated Press, “We always knew it was a long shot.”

He said he is hopeful that one day the flag will come down. “It seems that the public sentiment continues to change, and I am confident that it will come down in my lifetime, and definitely in my daughter’s.”

According to The Associated Press, Moore filed his lawsuit in 2016. A federal district judge and an appeals court ruled against him, but his attorneys asked the Supreme Court in June to consider the case during the term that started in October.

Moore contended in the suit, in part that the flag is an oppressive symbol, that students should not have to see in public schools. But Republican Gov. Phil Bryant has called the lawsuit “frivolous”, according to published reports. He has stated on numerous occasions that if the flag was to be given a makeover, it should be done by a statewide vote, as occurred more than 16 years.

However, according to The Associated Press, in written arguments filed to the Supreme Court on Oct. 18, attorneys for the governor wrote of Moore: “All in all, Petitioner alleges that he personally and deeply is offended by Mississippi’s state flag — and the sincerity of those beliefs is not doubted.” But the state attorneys said a lawsuit must show an “allegation of discriminatory treatment,” and Moore failed to do that.

Facebook Comments

Tags:

You May Also Like

Inspired by MLK, John Lewis Continues to Look for “Good Trouble”

This post was originally published on this siteJohn Lewis is always looking for “good ...

Meek Mill Documentary Heading to Amazon

This post was originally published on this site A new documentary chronicling Meek Mill’s ...

Hidden Figures: The Colored Girls of Politics

This post was originally published on this site Whether seen or unseen, black women ...

Red Table Talk: Jada Pinkett Smith Starts a Multigenerational Dialogue

This post was originally published on this site Just in time for Mother’s Day, ...

BE Modern Man: Meet the Serial Entrepreneur Jean Alerte

This post was originally published on this siteBE Modern Man is an integrative program that ...

NBA Legend Bill Russell Loves Charles Barkley as Much as We Do

This post was originally published on this site NBA legend Bill Russell feels the ...

Chris Tucker Presses Gas on Rush Hour 4

This post was originally published on this site For the past seven years, neither ...

Rules For Navigating The Dating World In The Age Of Social Media

This post was originally published on this site Unsplash Living in Houston, I can’t ...

UMBC’s NCAA Tournament Upset Shines Light On Academic Black Excellence

This post was originally published on this site The University of Maryland, Baltimore County ...

NAACP LDF Files Lawsuit Accusing DHS of Discriminating Against Haitian Immigrants

This post was originally published on this siteThe NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund ...