Should Facebook Still Be Part of Your Social Media Marketing In 2019?

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Many small businesses are trying to decide on their social media marketing in 2019. Marketing for most small businesses is often not a priority, but it should be. How else will people learn about your product or services? Word of mouth? Well that might have worked 15 or 20 years ago, but does not work now. Today’s audience does not “talk” to each other; they text, chat, and wave to each other online.

Small businesses can compete in the social media realm so long as they have a strategy.

For the first time in social media history, Facebook is in the number three spot for social networks, just behind YouTube and Google. Facebook still has 1.47 billion people logging in daily with more than 70% in the United States. Therefore, Facebook is still a safe and lucrative place to put your marketing dollars.

So, where do you start with your marketing strategy? My suggestion is Facebook, YouTube and Direct Mail Marketing. Otherwise known as cross channel marketing.

The Real Deal on a Social Media Marketing in 2019

Facebook

Facebook is still a great place for your brand to get discovered. More people go to Facebook first for research and recommendations than any other social media outlet. Paid ads are a great way to get discovered, if you know your target demographics and use the audience selection features to ensure you are reaching your potential customers. It’s also cost effective with a great ROI.

YouTube

YouTube recently surpassed Facebook as the number one social network. Creating video content is a critical part of your marketing strategy. Not just video, but mobile-optimized video is crucial for brand awareness. There is nothing more frustrating to our mobile hungry younger generation than a video that doesn’t load or is not clear in the size screen they want to view it on. Slow-loading video is a quick way to lose potential customers.

Marketing is an ever-changing beast. Your market reach is no longer determined by zip codes. Social media is your marketing stage. Consider the numbers — two out of three shoppers online have purchased something from a business in another country. Does this mean we abandon the local SEO? Of course not, it actually means you have to work harder to get found because it’s not just what’s local. It’s more about convenience. Many of these studies have noted that people are willing to pay more if getting the product or using the service makes life easier for them.

So, how to appeal to the local market? Consider direct mail campaigns. This cross-channel marketing method helps you connect with your local customer in a familiar but new way.

 

The post Should Facebook Still Be Part of Your Social Media Marketing In 2019? appeared first on Black Enterprise.

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